Types of Cancer

 

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Cancer of any type occurs when mutated cells in a region of the body form and begin overtaking healthy cells. Oncologists typically classify types of cancer according to which organ or body region it has attacked.

Below you can learn more about the causes, symptoms and treatment options for just some of the cancers we treat.


Cancer Overview | cCARE, San Diego & Fresno | Woman living with cancer | cCARE | San Diego and Fresno, CA | Woman in headscarf living with cancer

Cancer overview

Cancer is a group of related diseases caused by uncontrolled cell growth. There are over 100 types of cancer, including those listed below.

Cancer treatment and detection are becoming more advanced resulting in fewer deaths, and many cancers can be prevented through healthy lifestyle choices and avoiding known risk factors.

Learn more about risk factors, causes, symptoms and treatments.

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Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of cells in the tissue of the bladder, a small hollow organ in the pelvis region responsible for receiving and storing urine.

Brain Cancer & Spinal Cancer

Spine and brain cancer cause tumors in the central nervous system. Symptoms of these cancers can vary considerably, including pain, weakness and numbness.

Breast Cancer

Breast cancer occurs when normal cells in the breast begin to grow out of control and result in a cancerous tumor(s). According to the American Cancer Society, about 1 in 8 women will develop a form of breast cancer in their lifetime.

Cervical Cancer

Cervical cancer occurs in a woman’s cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus that connects it to the vagina. Regular Pap smears and HPV (human papillomavirus) testing helps detect this type of cancer early on.

Colon & Rectal Cancer

As the third most common type of cancer in the United States, colon and rectal cancer, together known as colorectal cancer, occurs when cancer cells form in the cells of the colon, rectum or both.

Endometrial Cancer

Endometrial cancer, or uterine cancer, develops in the lining of the uterus (endometrium) and most often affects women over the age of 55.

Esophageal Cancer

Esophageal cancer is the result of uncontrolled growth of cells in the esophagus, the tube that connects the throat to the stomach. There are two types of esophageal cancer, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. Cancer of the esophagus is more common in men than women and chances of developing it increase with age.

Kidney Cancer

Also known as renal cancer, kidney cancer is the result of cells mutating in one or both of the kidneys. Kidney cancer is much more common in older people and, according to the American Cancer Society, the average age of diagnosis is 64.

Leukemia

A rare form of cancer, leukemia develops in the white blood cells found in bone marrow, which is responsible for creating blood. Leukemia discourages the body from fighting off infections.

Liver Cancer

More than 33,000 people in the United States are diagnosed with liver cancer each year. Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common form of liver cancer.

Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is an uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the tissue of one or both lungs. Lung cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer and smoking greatly increases the chances of being diagnosed with lung cancer.

Melanoma

Melanoma skin cancer, the least common of skin cancers, begins in the skin’s melanocyte cells (responsible for pigmentation) and is a dangerous form of skin cancer. Overexposure to the sun causes melanoma, which is indicated by marks on the skin and is highly treatable when detected early.

Myelodysplastic Syndrome (MDS) Symptoms & Treatment

Myelodysplastic syndromes, or MDS, are a group of disorders in which a person's bone marrow does not produce enough functioning red, white or platelet blood cells. Left untreated, serious issues arise. Learn more about MDS signs and treatment.

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Cancer that begins in the lymphatic system is known as non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The lymphatic system is part of the immune system that attacks infection and consists of lymph nodes found throughout the body.

Ovarian Cancer

Mutated cells that initiate in the ovaries, the two organs responsible for producing a woman’s eggs, lead to ovarian cancer. Oncologists typically do not diagnose this rare form of cancer until later stages, because there are few symptoms. Women don’t start showing signs until the cancer has spread and is harder to treat.

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic cancer occurs when cells grow abnormally in the pancreas, a small organ positioned in the lower portion of the stomach, and often become cancerous tumors. A rare type of cancer, pancreatic cancer presents no symptoms in the early stages and later stage symptoms might include loss of appetitive and weight.

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer develops in the prostate, a small gland that helps create the semen that nourishes and carries sperm. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among American men, and can be screened for with a PSA (prostate-specific antigen) test.

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. The cCARE team discusses factors, types, risks & treatments. Melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma are the most common types.

Thyroid Cancer

Thyroid cancer is abnormal malignant cell growth in the thyroid gland. The thyroid gland, located at the bottom of the neck, stores and produces hormones that help nearly every gland in the body function properly, as well as regulating metabolic rates and energy levels. Thyroid cancer is highly treatable.

Uterine Cancer

Uterine cancer is uncontrolled cell growth in or on a woman's uterus (womb), the female organ that sustains the fetus during pregnancy. Over 92 percent of uterine cancer cases are of endometrial cancer, a cancer that originates in the inner lining of the uterus called the endometrium. Treatment usually involves surgery, which may be combined with other treatment methods such as chemotherapy, radiation and hormone therapy.